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What Should I Do If A Concussion Occurs During a Sporting Event?

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What Should I Do If A Concussion Occurs During a Sporting Event?

If you suspect that an athlete has a concussion, implement your 4-step action plan:

Step 1: Remove the athlete from play.
Look for signs and symptoms of a concussion if your athlete has experienced a bump or blow to the head or body. When in doubt, keep the athlete out of play.

Step 2: Ensure that the athlete is evaluated by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion.

Do not try to judge the severity of the injury yourself. Health care professionals have a number of methods that they can use to assess the severity of concussions. As a coach, recording the following information can help health care professionals in assessing the athlete after the injury:

  • Cause of the injury and force of the hit or blow to the head or body
  • Any loss of consciousness (passed out/knocked out) and if so, for how long
  • Any memory loss immediately following the injury
  • Any seizures immediately following the injury
  • Number of previous concussions (if any)

Step 3: Inform the athlete’s parents or guardians about the possible concussion and give them the fact sheet on concussion.

Make sure they know that the athlete should be seen by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion.

Step 4: Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury and until a health care professional, experienced in evaluating for concussion, says they are symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play.

A repeat concussion that occurs before the brain recovers from the first—usually within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks)—can slow recovery or increase the likelihood of having long-term problems. In rare cases, repeat concussions can result in edema (brain swelling), permanent brain damage, and even death.

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